Parks definitions
  • Last updated:
  • 02 Jun 2019

Recreation parks are primarily used for recreation, social, cultural and leisure activities. They connect people to the outdoors and may provide other complementary values such as landscape enrichment, biodiversity or cultural conservation.

Beaches and Parks Directory interactive map

The Beaches and parks directory map is designed to help you find your park and see what facilities are provided.

How to use the interactive map: 

  1. Search your desired park by name (located top left).
  2. Open the Layers list (located far right) and select park facilities (select corresponding box), such as Tables, Seats and Barbecues.
  3. Zoom in or out on the aerial map to view your park. The pictograms (symbols) of selected park facilities will appear. 
  4. For more information, including photographs of your park, please return to the Beaches and parks directory and search your park using the 'Keyword' function.

Definitions and unpacked statistics

The Sunshine Coast's open space areas have been grouped into a park hierarchy based on their primary use. These park types are explained below.  View the SCC / Parks and Gardens unpacked statistics[616KB] for a snapshot of some interesting figures, such as the total number of hectares for recreation parks, the number of barbecues available across the region, plus much more. 

Council-wide parks

  • Large parks (minimum width of 100-200 metres) that attract residents and visitors from the local community, surrounding suburbs and outside the region.
  • Located within 20 kilometres from most residences.  Situated on, or close to an arterial road within walking distance of public transport with linkages provided to the recreational trails or pedestrian and bicycle networks. 
  • On-site car parking provided to meet user needs. Suitable activities may include recreation and community gathering, major events, outdoor leisure activities, community gardens, play spaces, dog off leash areas and skate parks. 
  • Suitable infrastructure may include public amenities, playground equipment, shelters with barbecue and picnic facilities and exercise equipment areas.

District parks

  • Moderately large parks (minimum width of 50-100 metres) that attract residents and visitors from the local community and surrounding suburbs.  
  • Located within 3 kilometres from most residences in urban areas. Situated on, or close to a distributor or arterial road within walking distance of public transport with linkages provided to the recreational trails or pedestrian and bicycle networks. 
  • On-site car parking provided to meet user needs. Suitable activities may include recreation and community gathering, community events outdoor leisure activities, community gardens, play spaces, dog off leash areas and skate parks.
  • Suitable infrastructure may include public amenities, playground equipment, shelters with barbecue and picnic facilities and exercise equipment areas.

Local parks

  • Small parks (minimum width of 50 metres) that cater for frequent visits and are located a short distance from home for local residents.
  • Located within 500 metres from most residences in urban areas or within a rural township in rural areas. May provide a trail head for recreational trails and have internal pathways connecting to the street. 
  • On-street car parking provided to meet user needs. Suitable activities may include recreation and social gathering dog on-leash exercise and play spaces. 
  • Suitable infrastructure may include playground equipment, shelters with picnic tables or shaded park seating and exercise equipment areas.

Civic parks

  • Vibrant urban parks (minimum width of 50m) that cater for residents and visitors in the heart of an activity centre. 
  • Located within an activity centre. Situated in a prominent and central location on multiple public transport links with a high level of pedestrian accessibility. Internal pathways connect to the street and linkages are provided to the recreational trails or pedestrian and bicycle networks. 
  • On-street car parking provided to meet user needs. Suitable activities may include recreation, community gathering and civic events. 
  • Suitable infrastructure may include public amenities, playground equipment, shelters with picnic tables or shaded park seating and exercise equipment areas.

Amenity reserves

  • Very small parks (less than 5000m2) that cater for short and frequent visits.
  • Located a short walk from resident’s homes.  The reserves provide relief from surrounding built forms and add to the amenity and natural character of a local area. May provide links to wildlife corridors with linkages to the recreation trails or pedestrian and bicycle network provided in urban areas.
  • Suitable activities include passive recreation.

Linear parks

  • Long narrow corridors of land (minimum width of 15-30 metres) that provide a destination in their own right due to attractive locations such as on water frontage and adjacent to natural features such as foreshores or bushland reserves.  
  • Located adjacent to foreshore areas or riparian corridors where possible. Linear Parks often connect other open space functions, key features and facilities with linkages provided to recreational trails or pedestrian and bicycle networks. 
  • Suitable activities may include recreation, dog on-leash exercise and use of exercise equipment.
  • Suitable infrastructure may include playground equipment, seating and exercise equipment areas. 

Landscape corridors

  • Long and narrow tracts of land that provide visual and physical landscape amenity. They do not encourage pedestrian access or provide recreational facilities. 
  • Landscape corridors can function as biodiversity linkages and connect nature to the urban built form.