Image
Protecting biodiversity on council land
  • Last updated:
  • 24 Dec 2021

Council has a number of programs to protect the Sunshine Coast biodiversity, agriculture, community and economy from the impacts of pest plants.

Council programs to manage invasive plants on council lands

Protecting Sunshine Coast Natural areas including endemic, vulnerable and endangered plants

Target species

High priority environmental pest plants 

Schedule

Ongoing

Location

Roadsides adjacent to Natural areas, national parks, nature refuges and land for wildlife properties

Protection methods

Invasive plants on roadsides are found through routine inspections of roadsides adjacent to natural areas, proactive pest plant surveys for high priority pest plants in areas where they have been previously detected and by community request. 

When found plants are controlled by foliar spray or manual removal. 

In some area Council replants native plants where possible to reduce erosion, prevent regrowth of invasive plants and restore biodiversity. 

Council undertakes monitoring of invasive plant treatment, removal and regrowth and where invasive plants are returning more control work is done. 

Protecting Sunshine Coasts Agricultural areas through monitoring and removal of high priority agricultural pest plants on council roadsides adjacent to agricultural land.

Target species

Fire weed (senecio madagascariensis)
Annual ragweed (ambrosia artemisiifolia)
Giant Rats Tail Grass (Sporobolus pyramidalis, S. natalensis)
Giant Parramatta grass (Sporobolus fertilis
Groundsel bush (Baccharis halimifolia)
African lovegrass (Eragrostis curvula)
Parthenium (Parthenium hysterophorus)
Prickly pear (Oppuntia spp. Other than Opuntia ficus-indica)
Crofton weed (Ageratina adenophora)

Schedule

Ongoing

Location 

Roadsides adjacent to agricultural areas

Protection methods

Invasive plant detection

  • Routine inspections of roadsides in agricultural areas 
  • Pest plant surveys are undertaken for high priority pest plants in areas where they have been previously detected
  • Pest plants are identified by residents and reported to council

Invasive plant control

  • Foliar spray 
  • Manual removal

Council works to restore biodiversity by replanting native plants where possible to increase biodiversity, reduce erosion and prevent regrowth of invasive plants 

Council undertakes monitoring of invasive plant treatment/removal and regrowth

Protecting Sunshine Coast Natural areas by undertaking targeted high priority pest plant survey and control

Target species

  1. Bitou bush (Chrysanthemoides Monilifera)
  2. Mexican bean tree (Cecropia spp.)
  3. Pond apple (Annona Glabra)
  4. Senegal tea (Gymnocoronis spilanthoides)
  5. Alligator weed (Alternanthera Philoxeroides)
  6. Prickly Acacia (Vachellia nilotica)
  7. Invasive cacti (multiple species)

Schedule

Ongoing surveys in areas where plants previously found according to seed life expectancy 

Location

  1. High risk areas where pest plants have previously found 
  2. Flying fox habitats (Mexican bean tree) 

Protection methods

Invasive plant detection

  • Routine inspections of areas where invasive plants have previously been found and eradicated 
  • Community request 

Invasive plant control

  • Foliar spray
  • Manual removal 

Council works to restore biodiversity with the replanting of native plants where possible to reduce erosion and prevent regrowth of invasive plants 

Council undertakes monitoring of invasive plant control to manage any regrowth