What is public art?
  • Last updated:
  • 23 May 2019

Public art can exist as standalone works or it can be integrated as a functional element such as bespoke seating or other structures. Artworks such as projections and ephemeral installations are also described as public art.

Public art is accessible to all, it's free and is viewable by individuals or in groups. 

Why is it important?

Creativity is an essential part of being human to express our thoughts and philosophies. Creativity can manifest in many forms such as permanent installations in public spaces. It also can present as temporary installations or performance. 

Art in public places enables community to connect, reflect and be inspired by the place in which they live. Visitors create inspiring memories that they can take with them when they leave. It also contributes to individuals being actively engaged in strengthening their community.

Public art contributes to a sense of place and identity. It has the capacity to shape our community environment. It enables us to engage in conversations which question, provoke and offer alternative voices in our culture.

Council manages new public art projects within streetscape and park developments. Council also delivers public art projects in partnerships with external organisations. Council supports the delivery of community public art project proposals from local artists and groups.

The Public Art Collection is guided by the Art and Heritage Collections Policy and the following principles: 

  • Excellence in project initiation, concept, design and fabrication 
  • Transparent decision-making processes
  • Contribution to local community character
  • Meaningful community engagement
  • Contribution to the region's economy
  • Building the capacity of local artists and arts organisations