Community Wild Dog Baiting Program
  • Last updated:
  • 22 Mar 2017

Council coordinates the delivery of a Community Wild Dog Baiting Program to reduce wild dog activity across the Sunshine Coast region.The program has been set up in response to community requests for assistance to manage wild dogs on their property. The baiting program uses the pesticide 1080 (Sodium fluoroacetate). Baiting is only conducted on land that is owned by residents who have agreed to be part of the baiting program. View a map of control areas[6970KB].

Baiting is scheduled to coincide with periods of high wild dog activity.

The Community Wild Dog Baiting Program will commence 24 April 2017 and is set to conclude 26 May 2017.

Key points:

  • Baiting is only conducted on land that is owned by residents who have agreed to be part of the baiting program.
  • The baiting program has been approved by the state government and is conducted in compliance with strict conditions.
  • Warning signs are displayed on all accesses to participating properties.
  • Native animals are less sensitive to 1080 than wild dogs and are therefore less likely to be affected by the baiting program.
  • Domestic dogs and cats will be killed by 1080 baits. Residents must not allow pets or working dogs to access areas where baiting is being conducted. Contact a vet immediately if you suspect your domestic animal has had contact with 1080.

If a 1080 baiting program is taking place in your local area, you should:

  • notify all visitors that a 1080 baiting program is taking place in the area
  • restrain or muzzle your domestic animals so they cannot access 1080 baits or poisoned animals.

1080 fact sheet

Biosecurity Queensland have advised council that 1080 is the most efficient, humane and species-specific pesticide currently available for the regional control of wild dogs in Australia. 

To find out more about the toxin 1080, see Biosecurity Queensland's 1080 (Sodium fluoroacetate) fact sheet.