Frequently Asked Questions
  • Last updated:
  • 08 Nov 2022

Check below for answers to our most frequently asked questions or get in touch with the team if you can’t find the answer you’re looking for.

The Central Meeting Place precinct is located on the Mooloolaba Esplanade at the end of Brisbane Road. It encompasses 6,500 square metres of beachfront parkland with viewing decks, meeting places, picnic areas, beach showers, toilets, landscaping, an integrated seawall, and a coastal pathway.

The Central Meeting Place is the next stage of the parklands to be constructed (Stage Two). This precinct sits between future stages the "Central Parkland" and "Southern Parkland" as envisioned by the 2015 Master Plan and subsequent 2019 Detailed Design.

Why does the location of public amenities (Loo with a View) differ between the 2015 Mooloolaba Placemaking Master Plan and the 2019 Detailed Design?

The Master Plan created in 2015 shows the public amenities in its current location, similar to the Loo with a View. The 2019 Detailed Design which evolved from the Master Plan, shows it slightly further to the north.

In January 2023, council endorsed for the existing Loo with a View to be replaced with new, fully inclusive public amenities, in the same location. The original Master Plan and Detailed Design will be amended to reflect this change.

The Master Plan provides a set of guiding principles for the foreshore and is revisited as the design and construction for each stage is considered, and then implemented. 
In 2022, as part of The Central Meeting Place precinct, the new public amenities were proposed to remain in the existing location, as per the 2015 Master Plan.


Location of public amenities in the Central Meeting Place

New public amenities will be built in the same location as the existing Loo with a View. 

Was Lindsay Clare, the original Loo with a View Architect, informed / consulted on the Mooloolaba Foreshore Revitalisation project and the Stage Two Central Meeting Place?

Yes. In April 2022, Sunshine Coast Council’s appointed design team contacted Lindsay Clare, to discuss the project including the current condition of the Loo with a View. Additionally, council’s Principal Architect, spoke with Mr Clare.

A subsequent meeting was held with Mr Clare in August 2022 to present the two design concepts ahead of Phase Two community engagement in September / October 2022.

Is the Loo with a View Heritage listed?

No. Council acknowledges the Loo with a View’s place in Mooloolaba’s modern history however the building does not have heritage status and is not identified as a ‘local heritage place’ in the current Sunshine Coast Planning Scheme (2014). 

Will the existing Loo with a View be demolished?

Yes. The existing Loo with a View building is nearing the end of its life and must be completely removed to allow for new accessible public amenities, and other community facilities to be built in the central foreshore area.

Community input in September/October 2022 helped council to determine the final design of the Central Meeting Place, including its new public amenities.

When will the Loo with a View be demolished?

Construction timelines for Stage Two Central Meeting Place are yet to be determined and council will continue to keep the community informed.

Will public amenities including toilets, hand washing, beach showers and change rooms remain in the central foreshore area?

Yes. The Stage Two Central Meeting Place involves addressing the existing Loo with a View, its aged state and accessibility issues – while still maintaining public amenities in the same location.

Why can’t the Loo with a View be renovated?

While currently safe and functional, two independent engineering and access reports have deemed many components of the 35-year-old Loo with a View building as limited remaining life.

The facility requires significant ongoing maintenance, and it is not compliant with current People with Disability Access or modern sustainable building design standards.

The building’s roof, timber decking and steel structure are suffering impacts from its highly corrosive beach environment.

Its surrounding decks and pathways provide limited access for those in our community with a disability, parents, carers, and those using mobility devices or prams.

Architects engaged by council for the Central Meeting Place’s concept design advise there are extensive design constraints associated with trying to refurbish the existing structure and ‘simply adding extra wheelchair ramps’ is not a feasible option.

In addition to the structural and accessibility issues, there are problems identified with:

  • building orientation to respond to the climate conditions
  • safety, security and lack of surveillance
  • compromised natural light and ventilation.

Removing all failing elements of the existing building would mean that only the concrete columns and block walls remain.

While these elements have some further lifespan, refurbishment is not considered economically or environmentally viable with the revitalised foreshore being created with a 50-year future design life.

The existing building must therefore be completely removed to allow for new accessible public amenities, and other community facilities to be built in the central foreshore area.

Is the existing toilet building unsafe? 

The current building is functional and safe. However, due to the building’s age and deterioration it requires significant ongoing maintenance which is expected to increase in the future.  Council will continue to maintain the existing facility until such time as the future of the public amenities, meeting spaces and viewing decks that will form part of the future Central Meeting Place is determined.

Why doesn’t the Loo with a View meet current Universal Access (People with a Disability) requirements?

The original Loo with a View was built 35 years ago. The toilet block was commissioned by the former Maroochy Shire Council in 1987.

The project’s designers included architectural firm Clare Design (Architect Lindsay Clare). In 1997 other elements were added including a viewing deck, beach access stairs, landscaping and artworks. This was designed by John Mongard with contribution by various artists.

The most recent Disability (Access to Premises – Buildings) Standards 2010 came into effect on 1 May 2011. The purpose of the Premises Standards is to make sure people with a disability (and their family members, carers, and friends) have equal access to public buildings. All new renovations and new buildings must comply with these modern standards.

An independent professional access audit in 2021 indicates that since the original facility was built in 1997, there are areas of non-compliance with the building and its surrounds when compared to current Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) standards.  

The Loo with a View no longer meets mandatory DDA requirements and does not meet council’s obligations, nor reflect council’s commitment to equity and inclusion.  

The Loo with a View, surrounding decks and pathways have very poor access for those in our community with a disability, parents, carers, and those using mobility devices or prams.

  • The current Accessible Toilet and shower is provided in a cubicle within the gender facilities, which means they are not unisex and cannot allow assistance by a carer of the opposite sex.
  • There are no ambulant toilet facilities provided in this location.
  • There is no Accessible Adult Change Facility or Changing Places Facility provided in this location.

Will any elements of the existing area be retained or repurposed in the delivery of the Stage Two Central Meeting Place?

Before construction starts on the Central Meeting Place, full documentation of existing buildings and vegetation is undertaken. This process identifies existing trees, building or public art elements that may be able to re-used/repurposed in the new Central Meeting Place area. Interpretive signage may also be considered.

 




Why did Council ask for community feedback about the Loo with a View as part of the Stage Two Central Meeting Place?

Based on the deteriorating condition and accessibility issues of the existing building, council identified an opportunity to seek feedback on how our community uses and values the current area including the public amenities, meeting spaces and viewing decks.

Has Council consulted with the Architects for Resilient Communities Sunshine Coast?

Yes. In addition to correspondence about the project, two stakeholder meetings have been held with representatives from Architects for Resilient Communities Sunshine Coast during the Phase One and Three Community Engagement periods.

Have the Traditional Custodians been consulted about the Central Meeting Place?

Yes. As part of the 2015 Master Plan and 2022 Community Engagement, council engaged with nominated representatives of the Traditional Custodians of the Sunshine Coast, the Kabi Kabi peoples.

 

What were the design concepts proposed for the Stage Two Central Meeting Place?

The community were asked to share their thoughts on two designs for the Central Meeting Place, referred to as Concept Blue and Concept Yellow for community engagement purposes.

Both the Blue and Yellow design concepts highlight Mooloolaba’s famed ocean views and feature accessible public amenities, including a Changing Places facility.

The designs offer similar functionality and amenity with viewing decks, meeting places, picnic areas, public toilets, beach showers, landscaping, an integrated seawall and a coastal pathway all part of both concepts.

The key difference between the two concepts is one separates these elements to prioritise public space and enable more expansive beach views (Concept Blue), while the other has the public amenities, viewing platform and event space located in one larger building (Concept Yellow) as occurs with the current facility.

Feedback received from more than 1300 surveys and conversations with the community and stakeholder groups showed clear preference for Concept Blue with 75 per cent support.

Concept Blue was endorsed by council in January 2023as the final stage outcome for the stage Two Central Meeting Place.

The project will now proceed with detailed design - amending previously adopted Place Making Mooloolaba Master Plan endorsed in 2015.

Concept Blue

    This reimagines Mooloolaba’s beachfront arrival experience and celebrates the beach and natural beauty as the hero of the foreshore.
  • A new, open-sided, shade canopy inspired by nature, creates a new meeting place and event space, which flows onto a large, grassed area.
  • This open-plan design allows for increased beachfront parkland with new viewing decks, grassed areas and terraced seating.
  • New fully accessible public amenities, with Changing Places facilities and family change rooms, are located on the same level as Mooloolaba Esplanade for direct and easy access from the coastal pathway.
  • The public amenities are housed in ‘pods’ in the same architectural style as Stage One Northern Parkland. Walkways and breezeways provide enhanced ventilation and views from the Esplanade to the ocean.
Concept Yellow
  • This reflects on Mooloolaba’s recent history and involves the construction of a new and extended building that is strongly influenced by the existing Loo with a View architectural design.
  • A meeting place, on top of the public amenities block, is consistent with the existing structure, while a connected lower viewing deck offers a meeting place and event space.
  • Views of the beach and Point Cartwright are appreciated from an open, boat inspired, timber deck.
  • New public amenities are located on the lower viewing deck, with entry via stairs or disability complaint ramps, set down from the Mooloolaba Esplanade level.

 


How were design concepts for the Stage Two Central Meeting Place informed?

The design concepts for the Stage Two Central Meeting Place were guided by the 2015 Master Plan along with Placemaking Mooloolaba design principles, critical engineering reports, climate change considerations and community engagement feedback.

How much will the Stage Two Central Meeting Place cost?

The cost of construction will be dependent on the final detailed design, site considerations, and the climate in the construction market at the time the project goes to market for tender. Based on current estimates (August 2022), the project will cost approximately $15 - $16 million. Works are also subject to state authority approvals and funding opportunities.

When will the Loo with a View be demolished?

Timing is yet to be determined. Council will continue to keep the community informed.

When will construction of the Stage Two Central Meeting Place start?

Construction is expected to commence in 2024, pending state authority approvals, funding availability, and completion of the detailed design. Council will continue to keep the community informed.

How will the community’s needs for toilets/showers/water/etc be serviced when the Central Meeting Place is under construction? 

Following appointment of a construction contractor for The Central Meeting Place, a construction schedule will be determined. This will include consideration of the provision of public amenities on the central foreshore which may include temporary toilets. 

How will parking and traffic conditions change during the construction period?

Following appointment of a construction contractor for the Central Meeting Place, a construction schedule will be determined. This will include consideration of parking and traffic conditions.

What will be done to support local business during the construction period?

Council acknowledges the impacts that major construction work can have on local communities. The Mooloolaba Foreshore Revitalisation Project has been in progress for many years, with the Master Plan endorsed in 2015.

The Mooloolaba Foreshore Revitalisation project is intended to deliver long term benefits to the Mooloolaba business community, property owners, and the extended Sunshine Coast region.

To help support businesses during construction, council has prepared T[1705KB]he Business Continuity Guide[1705KB] which is filled with ways to plan and prepare in advance of construction beginning in your area.

The construction team will work hard to minimise impacts to the local community and businesses during construction.

 


Will car parking be removed as part of the Stage Two Central Meeting Place?

There are no major parking changes planned along The Central Meeting Place section of the Mooloolaba Esplanade. This section retains public parking along the foreshore, subject to construction activities. 

Will some car parking be removed as part of future stages of the Mooloolaba Foreshore Revitalisation? 

Yes. The Mooloolaba Foreshore Revitalisation Project is increasing public beachfront parkland by 40 per cent and providing new community spaces, enhanced family facilities and accessible amenities to celebrate the natural and inclusive Sunshine Coast way of life.

The foreshore’s revitalisation is a multiple stage project taking place over many years, subject to funding.

Traffic and parking changes will take place according to the relevant timing of each stage.

The new ParknGo Mooloolaba Central car park on the corner First Avenue and Smith Street was an outcome of the 2015 Mooloolaba Placemaking Master Plan community engagement. It offers more than 700 public car parking spaces and 13 persons with disability bays. Free on-street parking is also available throughout Mooloolaba. Visit council’s website for more information on parking.

What will happen to the existing Beach Terrace car parking?

The endorsed 2015 Mooloolaba Placemaking Master Plan includes the removal of Beach Terrace car parking as part of the future Central Parkland section (just north of the Central Meeting Place). Council engaged extensively with the community, with 82 per cent supporting the 2015 Mooloolaba Placemaking Master Plan and 84 per cent support to remove beachfront carparking to enable more parkland for all to enjoy. Timing and funding are yet to be determined for this stage of the project.

The new ParknGo Mooloolaba Central car park on the corner First Avenue and Smith Street was an outcome of the 2015 Mooloolaba Placemaking Master Plan community engagement. It offers more than 700 public car parking spaces and 13 persons with disability bays. Free on-street parking is also available throughout Mooloolaba. Visit council’s website for more information on parking.

What will happen to car parking between the Central Meeting Place and Surf Life Saving Club?

Timing and funding for the Southern Parkland precinct are yet to be determined.  Changes to parking and traffic will be considered as part of the detailed design.

How will the Mooloolaba to Maroochydore (M2M) cycleway project impact parking in Mooloolaba?

The Mooloolaba to Maroochydore (M2M) cycleway project is being led by the Queensland Government Department of Transport and Main Roads and is being constructed in stages as timing and funding is determined.

Walking and cycling will play an important transport role in the future. Active transport will help deliver improved mobility, safer streets, healthier residents and a reduced impact on global climate.

Stages 3 and 4 of the M2M cycleway project will be delivered by council in the future and connect to and along the Mooloolaba Foreshore.

  • Stage 3 from Foote Street at Mooloolaba to the Mooloolaba Foreshore Precinct
  • Stage 4 from Mooloolaba Foreshore Precinct to Venning Street at Mooloolaba

Timing for these projects has yet to be determined.

For more information on the M2M project please visit https://www.tmr.qld.gov.au/projects/mooloolaba-to-maroochydore-cycleway#stages

Will People with Disability (PWD) parking be retained on the Mooloolaba Foreshore?

Yes. Council is committed to building inclusive communities and people with disability (PWD) Parking will remain available along the foreshore as part of all stages of the Mooloolaba Foreshore Revitalisation.

As well as PWD access, the foreshore parking plan will include passenger pick up/drop off facilities, short-term parking and loading zones for residents, visitors and commercial vehicles.

In addition to this, the undercover parking at ParkNGo Mooloolaba Central (corner of Smith Street and First Avenue) has more than 700 public car parking spaces and 13 PWD bays available for only $5 a day. The parking facility is less than 300m to the flagged area of Mooloolaba Beach and the Mooloolaba Foreshore.

Where can I park in Mooloolaba? 

Undercover parking is available at the nearby ParknGo Mooloolaba Central on the corner of Smith Street and First Ave. The multi-level carpark is just $5 per day and offers over 700 car parks, 13 people with disability parking spaces, electric vehicle charging bays and more.

Free on-street parking is also available throughout Mooloolaba.

https://www.sunshinecoast.qld.gov.au/Living-and-Community/Parking/Sunshine-Coast-Parking-Maps

Are there other ways to visit Mooloolaba?

Visitors are encouraged to catch public transport, cycle, scoot or walk to Mooloolaba where possible.

Active Transport such as walking and cycling will play an important transport role in the future. Increasingly, active transport will help deliver improved mobility, safer streets, healthier residents and reduced impact on global climate, all resulting in a world-class quality of life.

The Sunshine Coast Active Transport Plan 2011-2031 sets  an achievable vision, which sees walking and cycling playing an essential part in creating an integrated transport system for the Sunshine Coast region.

 

What is meant by the term ‘Universal Access’ and ‘accessible environment’?

An accessible environment is one which provides safe, dignified and equitable access for all users of a building or space. 
See more information about accessibility at the Australian Human Rights Commission webpage here: https://humanrights.gov.au/our-work/disability-rights/frequently-asked-questions-access-premises#BCA

What is a Changing Places Toilet facility?

Changing Places toilets provide:

  • a height-adjustable adult-sized change table
  • a constant-charging ceiling track hoist system
  • a centrally-located peninsula toilet
  • circulation spaces as defined in the design specifications
  • an automatic door with a clear opening of 950 mm at a minimum (1100 mm for beach and lake locations)
  • a privacy screen

Why is Universal Access and a Changing Places facility important?  

For the first time ever, the Mooloolaba foreshore would offer world class, best practice, fully accessible public amenities to better serve our wider community and enhance the Mooloolaba experience for everyone of all ages and abilities, to enjoy.

 

Are other parts of the Central Meeting Place open for consultation?

Not at this time. Feedback has only been sought on elements of the 2015 Mooloolaba Placemaking Master Plan and subsequent 2019 Detailed Design that have since been significantly impacted by social and environmental change. 

Who is in the project consultant team for the Central Meeting Place design concepts?

  • Landscape architecture: Place Design Group (Sunshine Coast office)
  • Architecture: Bark Design Architects (a local architectural design firm)
  • 3D virtual reality models and artist impressions: Iluka Creative (local designer)
  • Coastal engineering: JBPacific Scientists and Engineers
  • Project Delivery and other stakeholders within Sunshine Coast Council

Will there be children’s water play on the Mooloolaba Esplanade?

Yes. A children’s water play area is one of the outcomes of community consultation from the 2015 Mooloolaba Placemaking Master Plan. It will be incorporated into a future stage, the Southern Parkland. The timing and funding for this stage is yet to be determined.

The tidal ocean pool has not progressed through the recent design process.

The masterplan identified short, medium and long-term improvements for the Mooloolaba foreshore. Infrastructure investments have been prioritised to provide the short and medium-term outcomes, with the tidal pool being a long-term aspiration.

The Traditional Owners will also need to be engaged in the development of any plans for a tidal pool. Relevant environmental approvals from the Queensland Government will also need to be obtained.

Council has considered the economic impact of the Mooloolaba Foreshore Revitalisation using the local economy microsimulation model provided by National Economics (NIEIR) and an independent report produced by .id the population experts

Mooloolaba’s Stage One Northern Parkland, complete with a 200-metre accessible boardwalk, viewing platforms, state-of-the-art playground, renewed seawall, public amenities, and community infrastructure is attracting thousands of additional visitors to the Mooloolaba foreshore and injecting $9 million worth of extra expenditure into local businesses each year.

The total spend in Mooloolaba was $115 million in the quarter between July and September 2022 – an increase of $9m compared to $106m in the previous quarter.

Future stages of the Mooloolaba Foreshore Revitalisation will continue to improve economic and social outcomes in the precinct by increasing visitation and improving local amenity. 

The project will help elevate Mooloolaba in the regional employment hierarchy; support the ongoing activity levels required to maintain the profitability of businesses and landowners; and improve the attractiveness of the precinct to do business.

Tourism and hospitality are key industries and major contributors to Sunshine Coast’s economy. The development of an improved tourism offer has the potential to attract new visitation as well as extend the length of trip and tourism expenditure captured in the region.

Mooloolaba’s $16 million Northern Parkland was crowned Project of the Year and also took out the $10 million to $20 million projects category at the Institute of Public Works Engineering Australasia Queensland and Northern Territory (IPWEA) 2022 Excellence Awards in October 2022.

The hectare of multi-level beachfront parkland, complete with a 200-metre accessible boardwalk, viewing platforms, state-of-the-art playground, renewed seawall, public amenities, and community infrastructure is attracting thousands of additional visitors to the Mooloolaba foreshore and injecting $5.5 million worth of extra expenditure into local businesses each year.

The coveted awards recognise outstanding community and economic contribution through exceptional project planning, stakeholder engagement, innovation, sustainability and environmental management.

The Stage One Northern Parkland has also received the Green Space Urban Award by the Australian Institute of Horticulture Inc (AIH), which recognises environmental responsibility and ‘greening’ the built landscape.

These outstanding awards support the Sunshine Coast’s Vision to be Australia's most sustainable region: Healthy. Smart. Creative.

The national recognition enhances community pride while also positioning our region as an environmental unique, liveable, and resilient regional city.