Dicky Beach rock seawall
  • Last updated:
  • 16 Jun 2020

A proactive plan is in place to protect Sir Leslie Wilson Park, at Cooroora Street Dicky Beach, from the threat of future severe shoreline erosion.

This includes an application for a permit to build a rock wall at Cooroora Street, Dicky Beach, in the future only if the current management option of beach scraping and sand renourishment is no longer feasible.

Although council is putting a plan in place now, there is no timeline proposed for the construction of the rock wall.

Instead, the area and the site conditions will be monitored and council will respond once the current strategy is no longer considered to be effective.

Project scope

The Sunshine Coast has approximately 60 kilometres of coastline, stretching from Caloundra to Peregian Beach. Our beaches are vulnerable to repeated erosion during storms, swells and weather events.

Council has a Shoreline Erosion Management Plan (SEMP) in place to guide its management of the areas vulnerable to severe erosion. It outlines preferred management options that are underpinned by sound science, coastal engineering principles and our community values.

One of the locations under threat is Sir Leslie Wilson Park, at Cooroora Street, Dicky Beach.

Council has been guided by the SEMP to protect this site from severe erosion by taking the following management activities:

  1. Revegetating the dunes (in partnership with the local Wildlife Preservation Society of Queensland group) with new fences installed.
  2. Carrying out annual beach scraping and sand renourishment of the area to replenish the sand on the dunes.

For the time being, the sand renourishment strategy is working, however if it no longer remains a viable option or proves unsuccessful, the next option is to build a rock seawall.

To do this, council needs to put a plan in place now – so it can act quickly if the seawall is required.

This plan involves applying for a development permit to build a rock seawall.

To prepare for this, council has submitted a development application which seeks approval for a rock wall to be built in the future only if the current management option of beach scraping and sand renourishment no longer works.

What a rock seawall protects

A seawall will protect the open space at Sir Leslie Wilson Park and the future coastal pathway and the historic Norfolk Island pine trees.

Our coastline is an important part of who we are and council is planning ahead to make sure we can all enjoy our beaches, coastal parks and pathways now and in the future.

Existing nearby rock seawall

A rock seawall already exists to protect the private property nearby. This seawall was constructed by the property owners to protect their private property as emergency works following a series of erosion events. Council approval was given for this wall.

Project update

Seawall design

The seawall design[7051KB] is available to view.

The seawall has been designed with a similar look and feel to the seawalls already in place at Queen of Colonies Parade, Moffat Beach and Lower Neill Street, Dicky Beach. It would be constructed with natural rock materials from local quarries with very good longevity, being designed to withstand a 1 in 50 year storm event.

The structure will be built by placing natural rocks in an alignment which ensures current aesthetics and useability of the area are not seriously changed or impacted. See figures 2 and 3 for the seawall design.

No disruption to nesting turtles

Any future work will occur outside of the turtle nesting season, and the beach will be re-profiled with available sand after the work has finished.

Where to from here

The application for a permit to build the seawall will be assessed by council against State Code 8: Coastal development and tidal works of the SDAP modules. The application is referred to relevant Queensland Government departments for review.

Although council is putting a plan in place now, there is no timeline proposed for the construction of the rock wall.

Instead the area and the site conditions will be monitored and council will respond if the current strategy no longer works.

Contacts

For information about the project email CoastalandCanals@sunshinecoast.qld.gov.au.